2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale
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Spanning the years 1940 to 1965, The Last Lion: Defender of the Realm begins shortly after Winston Churchill became prime minister—when Great Britain stood alone against the overwhelming might of Nazi Germany. In brilliant prose and informed by decades of research, William Manchester and Paul Reid recount how Churchill organized his nation’s military response and defense, convinced FDR to support the cause, and personified the “never surrender” ethos that helped win the war. We witness Churchill, driven from office, warning the world of the coming Soviet menace. And after his triumphant return to 10 Downing Street, we follow him as he pursues his final policy goal: a summit with President Dwight Eisenhower and Soviet leaders. And in the end, we experience Churchill’s last years, when he faces the end of his life with the same courage he brought to every battle he ever fought.
 
NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The Wall Street Journal • The Daily Beast • St. Louis Post-Dispatch • The Daytona Beach News-Journal • Kirkus Reviews • Booklist
 
“Majestic . . . This book is superb. It has tremendous pace, rich detail and immense drama.” The Washington Post
 
“Masterful . . . The collaboration completes the Churchill portrait in a seamless manner, combining the detailed research, sharp analysis and sparkling prose that readers of the first two volumes have come to expect.” —Associated Press

“Matches the outstanding quality of biographers such as Robert Caro and Edmund Morris, joining this elite bank of writers who devote their lives to one subject.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“Breathtaking . . . brilliant and beautiful, evocative.” —The Boston Globe
 
“A must-read finale for those who loved Manchester’s first two books.” —USA Today
 
“The final volume is . . . majestic and inspiring.” People
 
“One of the most thorough treatments of Churchill so far produced.” Library Journal (starred review)

Review

“Majestic . . . This book is superb. It has tremendous pace, rich detail and immense drama.” The Washington Post
 
“Masterful . . . The collaboration completes the Churchill portrait in a seamless manner, combining the detailed research, sharp analysis and sparkling prose that readers of the first two volumes have come to expect.” —Associated Press
 
“Matches the outstanding quality of biographers such as Robert Caro and Edmund Morris, joining this elite bank of writers who devote their lives to one subject.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“Breathtaking . . . brilliant and beautiful, evocative.” —The Boston Globe
 
“A must-read finale for those who loved Manchester’s first two books.” —USA Today
 
“The final volume is . . . majestic and inspiring.” People
 
“One of the most thorough treatments of Churchill so far produced.” Library Journal (starred review)

About the Author

William Manchester was a hugely successful popular historian and renowned biographer. In addition to the first two volumes of The Last Lion, his books include Goodbye, Darkness, A World Lit Only by Fire, The Glory and the Dream, The Arms of Krupp, American Caesar, and The Death of a President, as well as assorted works of journalism. He was awarded the National Humanities Medal and the Abraham Lincoln Literary Award. He passed away in 2004.
 
Paul Reid is an award-winning journalist. In late 2003, Manchester, in failing health, asked him to complete The Last Lion: Defender of the Realm. He lives in North Carolina.

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Top reviews from the United States

Pete Santos
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is an excellent finale to the three book series
Reviewed in the United States on April 18, 2017
This is an excellent finale to the three book series. I have read an awful lot about Winston Churchill by now. He was by no means a perfect person and this book does not represent him as such. But when it is all said and done,,,, Charles DeGaulle, (who had a complicated... See more
This is an excellent finale to the three book series. I have read an awful lot about Winston Churchill by now. He was by no means a perfect person and this book does not represent him as such. But when it is all said and done,,,, Charles DeGaulle, (who had a complicated relationship with alot of the leaders of the Allies), had the band play Fr''ere Victoire when Churchill came to Paris.... And said it was "Only Justice" that it was so.
Papa Victory....Father of the Victory pretty much summed it up. He stood up to Hitler when England was all alone and many in England were trying to figure out how they might arrange a truce. The darkest days of the initial German Invasion... he was in France as the Prime Minister.... He undertook grueling airplane trips to meet with Roosevelt in North Africa and Canada.... he went to Moscow via Africa.... he was not a young man at the time... I was impressed by many things about Churchill, his leadership. His willingness to put his own bacon in the fire without hesitation.... he was a great man and I don''t think he is appreciated for how great he was.
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Gary Moreau, Author
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mr. England: Genius, Oratory, Warts and All
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2020
By noted author and historian, William Manchester, and finished, upon his death, by Paul Reid, this is the third book in the Churchill trilogy and covers the period beginning with World War II and finishes with Churchill’s death in 1965. It’s an exhaustive work, filling... See more
By noted author and historian, William Manchester, and finished, upon his death, by Paul Reid, this is the third book in the Churchill trilogy and covers the period beginning with World War II and finishes with Churchill’s death in 1965. It’s an exhaustive work, filling 1200 pages in the paperback version, with more detail about the war than you can possibly digest, much less remember.

As it is a book about the man, however, Churchill is described and analyzed in the context of each event. But how much can anyone say about one man, even one as complex and bigger than life as Winston Churchill? As a result, the character analysis, as such, does tend to become redundant over so many events. We get it: He was a cantankerous man with boundless energy who loved his country, his drink, and his cigars, and who, at times, displayed true love and wit and who always spoke with a flourish that few politicians before or since could duplicate. He was, in a few words, a truly brilliant eccentric brimming with emotion of every stripe who had incredible vision and unwavering persistence.

Regarding the war, a friend who had fought in the jungles of Vietnam in the mid-60s once told me that no author or director had ever captured the one defining attribute of every battlefield – chaos. The same is apparently true in the map rooms, offices, and bunkers where war is strategized and planned. The reader gets the sense that we didn’t so much fight the war as we stumbled through it. I mean no disrespect in that observation. Such is the nature of the beast. But it is quite amazing, distressing, perhaps, how the war could have come out so differently at a thousand points along the way.

And that, I suppose, is the one undeniable reason to avoid war at all costs. You never really know how it’s going to turn out. Hitler had to be stopped. Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin, the latter once having once been Hitler’s ally, all understood that. Violence was unavoidable. The exception, however, never fully negates the rule.

And perhaps it was unavoidable, given the authors’ desire to draw sharp edges around the focus of their efforts (i.e. Churchill) that Roosevelt is defined in far less favorable shades than he is in Doris Kearns Goodwin’s outstanding book, “No Ordinary Time,” a biography of the Roosevelts. In the end, however, I didn’t feel they quite made their case regarding Roosevelt, nor, perhaps, did they want to, given that this was a book about Churchill, so I’m sticking with DKG’s more flattering portrayal.

In the end, Churchill, largely through soaring rhetoric, brave example, and inexhaustible energy, kept his “small island”, as he refered to it, in the war. It was Russia, however, which paid the biggest price, having lost up to 30 million soldiers and civilians in the end, and the US industrial machine that actually made winning possible. American factories, and the ingenious lend-lease program, outfitted the US, British, and Russian armies almost single-handedly, all while fighting battles of survival in both Europe and the Pacific.

The book is well written, but unless you are a history buff, you are bound to find it a bit long in length and on detail. In the end I was glad I read it but whenever I read a book about war I am left with the same question: Why are we still fighting them? They are savage affairs that bring out the worst in everyone. People on all sides end up doing things they would never condone in peacetime (the good guys included). There are no real winners and none of the characters emerges truly heroic or morally pristine. (Such honesty is a credit to the authors, to be sure.)

Nonetheless, Churchill came along at a time when his country and the world truly needed him. He is an unparalleled historic figure who left nothing on the field of play. He was truly an extraordinary figure I am not sure could ever be duplicated.

The world would be a very different place if he hadn’t been a part of it all.
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Valjean
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
His Finest Hour (and Day, Week, Month and Year)
Reviewed in the United States on September 3, 2017
The late Mr. Manchester and his corroborator Mr. Reid have written an exquisitely orthogonal volume: ‘The Last Lion’ encompasses an American perspective on the most British of leaders, a riveting read stretching well past 1000 pages, and not least a treasure trove of fresh... See more
The late Mr. Manchester and his corroborator Mr. Reid have written an exquisitely orthogonal volume: ‘The Last Lion’ encompasses an American perspective on the most British of leaders, a riveting read stretching well past 1000 pages, and not least a treasure trove of fresh scholarship to contribute on perhaps the most important 20th century statesman, not to mention World War II (which comprises nearly all of the work). Simply put, if you think you know everything about the war – much less Mr. Churchill – I implore you to dive in; this is a doorstop, to be sure, but also probably the best non-fiction one I’ve ever tackled.

The interweaving of war history with Churchill’s life – to be sure, from 1940 to 1945 they were impossible to separate – illuminates and magnifies both stories and ends up as perhaps the best testament to the subject imaginable: since he was so intimately involved in every aspect of the fight we see perspectives large and small – not to mention all their exhilarating and terrifying consequences. To match this intimacy Churchill’s obvious wartime strengths – boldness, fortitude, even stubbornness – receive full emphasis by the authors while their astounding scholarship matches these traits to (usually) admirable outcomes. Having access to just about anything Churchill ever wrote – not to mention “over 50 exclusive interviews with his friends, family and colleagues in the early ’80s” – Mssrs Manchester and Reid bring plenty of new material to the fore, not all of it complimentary (e.g., Churchill’s family relations, Stalin’s notorious scheming, FDR’s measuring war aims to political advantage). The crispness of these new insights only stands out more starkly against such a familiar backdrop. And even with obvious knowledge of the outcome, I found myself so immersed in the narrative that I truly wondered how in the dark early days of the war (e.g., fall of France, the Blitz) Churchill would rally his holdout nation against the seemingly invincible might of the Nazis.

But rally he certainly does – and for a man in his mid-sixties at the war’s outbreak, Mr. Churchill’s uncanny energy and foresight are almost continually in evidence; obvious examples include his (largely ignored) warnings about Stalin’s ambitions in Eastern Europe (climaxed in his “Iron Curtain” speech, in Westminster, Missouri of all places), but lesser known ones (e.g., wholeheartedly pushing an *offensive* strategy in the eastern Mediterranean while Dunkirk was still in the headlines) arise at tantalizing intervals. Even the authors seem to betray some surprise at what they found, though in the context of the overall narrative it all makes perfect sense.

The only demerit I could find other commenters have probably covered: the advantages listed above obscure the simple fact that this is more war history than biography; no doubt a few wanting more dirt on Mr. Churchill (not to mention his eccentric clan) and details on his postwar years will be disappointed. But no matter: this is the final word on a great leader, with the scope and detail to match his outsized accomplishments. Anyone with even a passing interest in the war, Churchill, British/European history, or even individual battles and military tactics I expect will come away uniquely satisfied.
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joneslkr
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful trilogy
Reviewed in the United States on October 1, 2019
I am not a fast reader but having just finished the final volume, I looked back and found I''d read all three in 16 months. I am usually reading four books at a time, so I found that surprisingly quick. I couldn''t stop reading them. I love history and the details of... See more
I am not a fast reader but having just finished the final volume, I looked back and found I''d read all three in 16 months. I am usually reading four books at a time, so I found that surprisingly quick. I couldn''t stop reading them. I love history and the details of history. These books are rich in details. They present to the reader a magnificent and deeply flawed human being. There is no pretense. And whether you like him or agree with him or not, there is no arguing with his effect on the world we live in. I believe history should be written from history...letters, diaries and other contemporary sources. Mr. Manchester,it was obvious , loved history too. I wept at the end of Volume 2. Then I was disappointed in volume 3, assuming Mr. Reid, who had picked up the mantle, was not a lover of history. I found the war years dry. I believe now that war just reads differently than life because as we came past V-E and V-J day, I was jumping and clapping and weeping some more.
Dear Mr. Churchill! I found myself wanting to hug him and then smack him and then kiss him and then hit him with a stick.
I might just start Volume one again right now. I miss him already.
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M. A Newman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The last of the last lion
Reviewed in the United States on August 12, 2016
I first began this journey through the life of Churchill as seen through the imagination of William Manchester in 1982, when the first volume of this series came out. I didn''t know most of the people that I know now, my house had not been built, it was a Christmas present... See more
I first began this journey through the life of Churchill as seen through the imagination of William Manchester in 1982, when the first volume of this series came out. I didn''t know most of the people that I know now, my house had not been built, it was a Christmas present from a relative who is no longer alive. These are the sorts of thoughts that fill ones head when finishing the last volume in this series, 1200 pages that cover the last 25 years of Churchill''s life.

I will say that I am still think that Roy Jenkins'' biography is still the best, most concise and contains the most insight (Jenkins was not only in Parliament, but in Parliament when Churchill was also a member). He understands the central institution that defined Churchill. My second favorite is Churchill''s own "My Early Life," a book I read in middle school which affected my world view forever and ever.

The three books that are part of this series definitely have merit. I wholeheartedly believe that this third book, 1200 pages and all is worth a read. It was unfortunately not completed by its original author, the great William Manchester, author of so many excellent histories in the past. I think some of the immediate and intimate details that filled Manchester''s earlier works is lacking in this one, and one should be prepared to refight all of World War II in making the way for VE Day. Ultimately these faults are not decisive in affecting the overall quality of the book.

That said, this book is a marvelous achievement. Churchill is on display, warts and all, his gifts, his weaknesses and his stirring eloquence. There is Churchill the masterful strategic thinker at odds with Churchill the less capable tactician.

It probably will be more than a little daunting to undertake the journey I did 34 years ago, but I think at the end of it all the trip is worthwhile.
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John Walker
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Magnificent conclusion to the definitive biography of WInston Churchill
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2020
William Manchester''s monumental three volume biography of Winston Churchill, The Last Lion, began with the 1984 publication of the first volume, Visions of Glory, 1874–1932 and continued with second in 1989, Alone, 1932–1940 . I... See more
William Manchester''s monumental three volume biography of Winston Churchill, The Last Lion, began with the 1984 publication of the first volume, Visions of Glory, 1874–1932 and continued with second in 1989, Alone, 1932–1940 . I devoured these books when they came out, and eagerly awaited the concluding volume which would cover Churchill''s World War II years and subsequent career and life. This was to be a wait of more than two decades. By 1988, William Manchester had concluded his research for the present volume, subtitled Defender of the Realm, 1940–1965 and began to write a draft of the work. Failing health caused him to set the project aside after about a hundred pages covering events up to the start of the Battle of Britain. In 2003, Manchester, no longer able to write, invited Paul Reid to audition to complete the work by writing a chapter on the London Blitz. The result being satisfactory to Manchester, his agent, and the publisher, Reid began work in earnest on the final volume, with the intent that Manchester would edit the manuscript as it was produced. Alas, Manchester died in 2004, and Reid was forced to interpret Manchester''s research notes, intended for his own use and not to guide another author, without the assistance of the person who compiled them. This required much additional research and collecting original source documents which Manchester had examined. The result of this is that this book took almost another decade of work by Reid before its publication. It has been a protracted wait, especially for those who admired the first two volumes, but ultimately worth it. This is a thoroughly satisfying conclusion to what will likely remain the definitive biography of Churchill for the foreseeable future.

When Winston Churchill became prime minister in the dark days of May 1940, he was already sixty-five years old: retirement age for most of his generation, and faced a Nazi Germany which was consolidating its hold on Western Europe with only Britain to oppose its hegemony. Had Churchill retired from public life in 1940, he would still be remembered as one of the most consequential British public figures of the twentieth century; what he did in the years to come elevated him to the stature of one of the preeminent statesmen of modern times. These events are chronicled in this book, dominated by World War II, which occupies three quarters of the text. In fact, although the focus is on Churchill, the book serves also as a reasonably comprehensive history of the war in the theatres in which British forces were engaged, and of the complex relations among the Allies.

It is often forgotten at this remove that at the time Churchill came to power he was viewed by many, including those of his own party and military commanders, as a dangerous and erratic figure given to enthusiasm for harebrained schemes and with a propensity for disaster (for example, his resignation in disgrace after the Gallipoli catastrophe in World War I). Although admired for his steadfastness and ability to rally the nation to the daunting tasks before it, Churchill''s erratic nature continued to exasperate his subordinates, as is extensively documented here from their own contemporary diaries.

Churchill''s complex relationships with the other leaders of the Grand Alliance: Roosevelt and Stalin, are explored in depth. Although Churchill had great admiration for Roosevelt and desperately needed the assistance the U.S. could provide to prosecute the war, Roosevelt comes across as a lightweight, ill-informed and not particularly engaged in military affairs and blind to the geopolitical consequences of the Red Army''s occupying eastern and central Europe at war''s end. (This was not just Churchill''s view, but widely shared among senior British political and military circles.) While despising Bolshevism, Churchill developed a grudging respect for Stalin, considering his grasp of strategy to be excellent and, while infuriating to deal with, reliable in keeping his commitments to the other allies.

As the war drew to a close, Churchill was one of the first to warn of the great tragedy about to befall those countries behind what he dubbed the “iron curtain” and the peril Soviet power posed to the West. By July 1950, the Soviets fielded 175 divisions, of which 25 were armoured, against a Western force of 12 divisions (2 armoured). Given the correlation of forces, only Soviet postwar exhaustion and unwillingness to roll the dice given the threat of U.S. nuclear retaliation kept the Red Army from marching west to the Atlantic.

After the war, in opposition once again as the disastrous Attlee Labour government set Britain on an irreversible trajectory of decline, he thundered against the dying of the light and retreat from Empire not, as in the 1930s, a back-bencher, but rather leader of the opposition. In 1951 he led the Tories to victory and became prime minister once again, for the first time with the mandate of winning a general election as party leader. He remained prime minister until 1955 when he resigned in favour of Anthony Eden. His second tenure as P.M. was frustrating, with little he could to do to reverse Britain''s economic decline and shrinkage on the world stage. In 1953 he suffered a serious stroke, which was covered up from all but his inner circle. While he largely recovered, approaching his eightieth birthday, he acknowledged the inevitable and gave up the leadership and prime minister positions.

Churchill remained a member of Parliament for Woodford until 1964. In January 1965 he suffered another severe stroke and died at age 90 on the 24th of that month.

It''s been a long time coming, but this book is a grand conclusion of the work Manchester envisioned. It is a sprawling account of a great sprawling life engaged with great historical events over most of a century: from the last cavalry charge of the British Army to the hydrogen bomb. Churchill was an extraordinarily complicated and in many ways conflicted person, and this grand canvas provides the scope to explore his character and its origins in depth. Manchester and Reid have created a masterpiece. It is daunting to contemplate a three volume work totalling three thousand pages, but if you are interested in the subject, it is a uniquely rewarding read.
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KMcKay
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Doing justice to a great man
Reviewed in the United States on February 22, 2015
It''s a monumental undertaking covering The War and the advent of the Cold War from Churchill''s and the British perspective. A lot of important, often startling revelations that we never hear about in histories written from the American perspective--like the prickly... See more
It''s a monumental undertaking covering The War and the advent of the Cold War from Churchill''s and the British perspective. A lot of important, often startling revelations that we never hear about in histories written from the American perspective--like the prickly relationship of Churchill and Roosevelt; their attitudes about Stalin, de Gaulle and Chiang Kai-shek; and their disagreements over strategy and resources. Some of us know Roosevelt for what he was--one thing that emerges in this history is what scoundrels the Allied leaders were...but Churchill was a scoundrel for Great Britain, de Gaulle was a scoundrel for France. Roosevelt was a scoundrel for Roosevelt. Stalin was a monster, recognized as such by Churchill who nonetheless trusted and supported him to win The War; FDR never acknowledged the monster side of Stalin, whom he admired to the day he dropped dead in Hot Springs.

We Americans who read any history at all generally believe that FDR did the Lend-Lease program out of the goodness of his heart and to keep Britain alive until the US could enter the war. It wasn''t quite like that, and I feel ashamed over the price--prices--Roosevelt exacted from England for whatever we sent them in those terrible, dark days. In our histories we also don''t get a real sense of the horrors Germany rained upon Britain, or the suffering and courage of the Brits during the bombing.

Tidbits about the private lives of the Churchill family and the foibles of the great man himself--sometimes reading like a gossip column--add perspective and richly colored embroidery to this huge work. Seeing Churchill as a human in no way diminishes this giant among men.

Anybody with a serious interest in WWII history or military studies ought to read this. It was so interesting that now I''m going to have to get the first two books of the trilogy. My mental image of Churchill is limited to the rotund figure with the cigar and the bowler hat. I want to meet Churchill the dashing young warrior and polo player.

Most important is the lesson we ought to be taking today about the consequences of appeasement, of limited objectives and of expediencies.
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Donald
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2019
I was a little concerned because Paul Reid who I knew nothing about had to pick up the series after the death of William Manchester but I see little difference in the research or writing style! If anything it might be slightly better! I am currently on page 389 of about... See more
I was a little concerned because Paul Reid who I knew nothing about had to pick up the series after the death of William Manchester but I see little difference in the research or writing style! If anything it might be slightly better! I am currently on page 389 of about 1000 pages and enjoying it as much if not more than the previous two volumes! Churchill is one of the greatest leaders, not only in the 20th Century but also in Western Civilization! While not perfect, Churchill saved Great Britain and Western Civilization from the evil of the Nazi Regime just as Ronald Reagan finished off the evil Soviet Empire in the 1980s! Great book and great series! A must read! Fulfillment and delivery was excellent by Amazon as always!
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Ron Ball
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I have read a number of biographies of Churchill but for the general reader William Manchester''s is in many ways the best. Churc
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 24, 2014
It has been a long wait for this final volume in the three volume biography of Churchill, but it has been well worth that wait. William Manchester died before completing his work and it was Paul Reid who gathered all the loose ends together to bring us this final volume....See more
It has been a long wait for this final volume in the three volume biography of Churchill, but it has been well worth that wait. William Manchester died before completing his work and it was Paul Reid who gathered all the loose ends together to bring us this final volume. Many years ago, I acquired a copy of William Manchester''s history of the Krupp company over 400 years. This was a massive single volume work but was very readable and memorable. I subsequently read Death of a President and finally the first two volumes of Churchill''s life. I have read a number of biographies of Churchill but for the general reader William Manchester''s is in many ways the best. Churchill is almost viewed as god by British writers; a status he achieved through his leadership in the Second World War. But he became Prime Minister when he was in his late sixties, having previously held high office in governments before and after the First World War. This last volume of William Manchester''s work deals with Churchill''s life from the time of his becoming PM in 1940 to his death and state funeral in 1965. Most of the book deals with Churchill and the War. But this is to be expected. He was thrown out of office in the general election of 1945 when Clement Attlee became Prime Minister. But this was an attack on the Tory Party of Stanley Baldwin and Neviile Chamberlain, appeasement and their management of the years of depression. The country wanted a change from that. In 1945 Churchill was exhausted and had suffered more than one stroke. He returned to office as Prime Minister in 1951 but he was an old man, in far from robust health. He finally resigned when he was over 80 and spent his last ten years in quiet retirement. Paul Reid has done a good job finishing this book and it is to be thoroughly recommended.
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Hywel James
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Kindle edition poorly produced but a great read nonetheless.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 27, 2016
I emphasise that my four stars award stands for the Kindle edition of this book. The dramatic pace of the narrative is first-rate and the story of Churchill''s central role in World War Two is told with clarity and in absorbing detail. So far, so good. The problem lies in...See more
I emphasise that my four stars award stands for the Kindle edition of this book. The dramatic pace of the narrative is first-rate and the story of Churchill''s central role in World War Two is told with clarity and in absorbing detail. So far, so good. The problem lies in the Kindle text itself where something has gone disastrously wrong with the punctuation and the spelling. Commas are scattered around and bear no relation to the sentence structures, and many words have been wrongly spelled. It appears to be a mechanical or computer problem and not an editorial failing. Either way, it is a poor advertisement for the publisher and serves the writer(s) badly. This biography deserved better. Having said that, I enjoyed the book enormously. It places Churchill at the centre of events, which is as it should be given the period covered, 1945 to 1965, and while his influence naturally faded following his retirement as Prime Minister in 1955, the impact of his personality and his trenchant views on politics remained potent. The authorship of the book is American and it is therefore all the more surprising (and refreshing) how critical it is of Roosevelt and of American foreign policy generally during the period, particularly the unwillingness to recognise fully the threat of Hitler, the frankly mercenary attitude towards Lend Lease, and later the unwillingness to follow through at the end of the war the occupation of east Germany and beyond to thwart Stalin''s determination of establish his hold on Eastern Europe.
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cartoisb
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An engrossing history of Churchill and WW2
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 23, 2021
One could say that The Last Lion : Defender of the Realm is as much a history of the Second World War as it is a biography of Churchill during this period. The war and its aftermath are covered in a dramatic writing style with a focus on Churchill’s role and how he viewed...See more
One could say that The Last Lion : Defender of the Realm is as much a history of the Second World War as it is a biography of Churchill during this period. The war and its aftermath are covered in a dramatic writing style with a focus on Churchill’s role and how he viewed and impacted the events. The authors strike a good balance between the historical events and the personal details, such that the history is brought to life. It is a long book but fast-paced, well-written and never dull. The 2012 hardcover edition is a substantial high-quality volume.
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Mr. M. Herbert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Outstanding piece of literature.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 12, 2014
Outstanding piece of literature ! This book is exceptionally well written , detailed and highly and easily readable. In particular the first 50 pages or so, give the very best overview of Winston Churchill that I have have ever read, anywhere. These first introductory pages...See more
Outstanding piece of literature ! This book is exceptionally well written , detailed and highly and easily readable. In particular the first 50 pages or so, give the very best overview of Winston Churchill that I have have ever read, anywhere. These first introductory pages are superbly written, and give any reader a short, but highly comprehensive insight into this great man. The book thereafter is in chronological order, starting at his appointment as Prime Minister. As well covering all the many aspects of the progress of the war, the book contains intriguing accounts of the machinations of British politics throughout this hectic period. It regularly surprises the reader with additional "tit bits" about Churchill, his whims and fancies, as well as explaining his many controversial decisions. This really is a comprehensive book. It is part of a trilogy true, but frankly anyone interesed in discovering just what Churchill represented, how he conducted himself, how he dealt with so many controversial issues - and there were dozens and dozens of these during the 6 years of war - should at least read this single volume. It is never dry, never dull, never boring. It entertains, informs and draws admiration for this huge figure of British life, culture and above all, history. Apart from the occasional "Americanism " in the written word - eg.,"railroad" instead of "railway" etc. - this book is without fault. Excellent reading and VERY highly recommended
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Bill
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Get the book, but do not get the Kindle version.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 6, 2019
This is the final book in Manchester’s trilogy on Winston Churchill, ending with the close of the Second World War. Co-written by Paul Reid, who was nominated by Manchester to complete the volume after Manchester’s death, the text is fluid and fast moving. It paints a vivid...See more
This is the final book in Manchester’s trilogy on Winston Churchill, ending with the close of the Second World War. Co-written by Paul Reid, who was nominated by Manchester to complete the volume after Manchester’s death, the text is fluid and fast moving. It paints a vivid and colourful picture of this great man’s finest hour. What spoils it all in the Kindle edition is the appalling proofing. It is replete with syntax errors, punctuation and spelling mistakes that are both amateurish and an insult to the authors- to say nothing of the discerning reader. So get this book, but get it in print, not Kindle.
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2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale

2021 discount The 2021 Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: high quality Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 sale